[My Chamber of Textile Thoughts. No: LXXV | By Viveka Hansen]

The historical documentation over 520 pages is based on 10 years of textile research, emphasising the importance of a combination of theoretical and practical perspective as part of the IK Foundation’s Mundus Linnæi series. The aim with this post is to present a couple of sample pages from my new monograph and describe more details of this limited edition of 350 numbered copies – including 222 images and two newly-produced genuine Tapa cloth samples from Tonga. I am delighted that Gunnar Broberg, Professor emeritus and Editor for the Yearbook of the Swedish Linnaeus Society is introducing this volume.

0-textilia-linnaeana-1The seventeen Linnaeus Apostles were early scientific global travellers; young men who during half a century – 1745 to 1799 – travelled to more than fifty countries on all seven continents under commission of the famous Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus, Academies of Sciences, East India Companies or private patrons. Along with several expeditions, where some of the Apostles were engaged and participated – on James Cook’s first and second circumnavigations, in the Danish scientific expedition to South Arabia and the Imperial Academy of Sciences’ expeditions in Russia.

In these travellers’ extensive 18th century journals, scientific instructions, correspondence etc together with Linnaeus’ own works; various textile traditions and clothes were taken into account. Like descriptions of wool and woollen cloth, the manufacturing process of indigo, the importance of the commerce via caravan routes (the Silk Road) as well as the East India trade of luxury fabrics, linens, textile dyes and much more via harbours in Cadix, Madeira, St Helena, the Cape, Surat, Java and Canton in the main.

Please find out more – view six double-pages of the new book.

Pehr Kalm’s chapter covers thirty pages, mainly concentrating on textile observations from his journey in 1747-1751. He travelled by ship from Göteborg via Norway to England where he stayed for about six months before he reached his main destination North America. Here he traversed the colonies of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware and the south eastern parts of what today is Canada. This double-page gives some information about his extensive studies of textile dyes (pp. 42-43).

Pehr Kalm’s chapter covers thirty pages, mainly concentrating on textile observations from his journey in 1747-1751. He travelled by ship from Göteborg via Norway to England where he stayed for about six months before he reached his main destination North America. Here he traversed the colonies of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, New York, Delaware and the south eastern parts of what today is Canada. This double-page gives some information about his extensive studies of textile dyes (pp. 42-43).

Sample pages 96-97. (From the chapter of Göran Rothman – whom was financed by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, his journey brought him to Tunisia and Libya in 1773-1776).

Sample pages 96-97. (From the chapter of Göran Rothman – whom was financed by the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, his journey brought him to Tunisia and Libya in 1773-1776).

Sample pages 158-159. (From the chapter of Johan Peter Falck – he lead one of the Imperial Academy of Sciences’ natural history expeditions in Russia from 1768-1774).

Sample pages 158-159. (From the chapter of Johan Peter Falck – he lead one of the Imperial Academy of Sciences’ natural history expeditions in Russia from 1768-1774).

Sample pages 184-185. (From the chapter of Fredrik Hasselquist – his observations present a deep insight into textile trade and traditions of the 1750s in primarily Turkey, Syria, Egypt and Palestine).

Sample pages 184-185. (From the chapter of Fredrik Hasselquist – his observations present a deep insight into textile trade and traditions of the 1750s in primarily Turkey, Syria, Egypt and Palestine).

Sample pages 284-285. (From the chapter of Carl Linnaeus and his observations of raw materials, textiles, manufacturing, handicraft, trade and clothing from the 1730s to the 1770s).

Sample pages 284-285. (From the chapter of Carl Linnaeus and his observations of raw materials, textiles, manufacturing, handicraft, trade and clothing from the 1730s to the 1770s).

Sample pages 394-395. (The final conclusions on raw materials, fabric qualities, trade in silk, choice of dye plants etc. are to be found in the chapter, entitled ‘Conclusion – Textile studies during 18th century travels’ over 38 pages).

Sample pages 394-395. (The final conclusions on raw materials, fabric qualities, trade in silk, choice of dye plants etc. are to be found in the chapter, entitled ‘Conclusion – Textile studies during 18th century travels’ over 38 pages).

Some further information – the topics included in the volume cover:
Preparatory studies ahead of their voyages | Earlier periods from an 18th century perspective | Textile materials and links to the slave trade | Cotton as material | Knitted woollen garments as export articles | Differences in price of cloth and textile raw materials | Trade in cloth by sea – from the East Indies | Trade in cloth etc. in other regions, caravan routes (Silk Road) | Textiles as protective material for trade and storage | Import of raw silk | Wool and rearing of sheep and goats | Spinning and domestic weaving | Textile interior furnishing in the homes | Textile manufactures | Flax, hemp and nettle | Mulberry, silk and their prerequisites | Fine goose feathers and eiderdown | Indigenous peoples’ relationships with newly settled Europeans (and clothing) | Dye plants – domestic versus foreign | Export of dyestuffs from plantations | Laundering of clothes and combating vermin | Field work was tough on the clothes | Fashionable versus local dress codes | Dress showed well-being, power, position and tradition | Comparative studies between different local people’s clothing | Bark cloth | Luxury in clothes and interior decoration | The use of textiles for religious purposes | Healing properties of linen and other fabrics | Textile observations onboard | Scientific experiment – textile raw materials | Bedding for the voyage | Weaving or plaiting using different types of grass or fine leaves | Smuggling or theft of textiles | The textile dowry | The significance of textile gifts | 18th century publications of textile finds | Ethnographic collections of artefacts and textile samples.

Additionally:
– Four Appendixes (pp. 424-450) are included.
– Notes, Bibliography & List of Illustrations.
– The volume is concluded with an extensive Index.
– ISBN: 978-1-904145-32-5

7-textilia-linnaeana-banner-03-copyORDER ONLINE:
£55.00 plus shipping
10% discount for iFELLOWS (read more on the IK Foundation’s website)

– This is a not-for-profit project/publication. Please order a copy of the volume or recommend the monograph to your librarian, colleagues and friends.

Source:
Hansen, Viveka, Textilia Linnaeana – Global 18th Century Textile Traditions & Trade, London 2017. (Sample pages: ©Viveka Hansen)

PLEASE REFERENCE AS FOLLOWS:

– Hansen, Viveka, ‘Sample Pages: Textilia Linnaeana – Global 18th Century Textile Traditions & Trade (C 3)’, TEXTILIS (February 13, 2017); https://textilis.net/ (Accessed: Day/Month/Year)